A slightly less lonely passport

Brazil. Nepal. Slovakia. India. Finland. The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan (yes that’s the official name). Tunisia. Laos. Egypt. New Zealand. Norway. Peru.

Between 2003 and 2012, my passport filled with stamps from the many places I had the extraordinary privilege of traveling to. As a trip leader for a company with biking, hiking and multi-sport vacations all over the world, I had the incredible opportunity to live and work in a number of different countries, getting to know the cultures more intimately and having the chance to explore some of the less traveled paths. As a result, my time off from work while I was in these places allowed me to continue to travel and explore on my own, often times with little to no expectation or planning. It was as simple as finding a cheap flight and a fun destination and off I went.

A last minute schedule change to give me a week off from a long stretch of work in Tuscany allowed me to hop on a cheap flight to Romania and check out the land of Dracula. Killing time on a layover in Lima resulted in a chance stroll past a ticket counter advertising bargain flights to Buenos Aires so I had no choice but to pull out the credit card and book a flight for later in the summer. When my mom told me that she was going on a work trip to Sweden and I was on biking tours in Spain, I decided that it made perfect sense to squeeze in a trip up to northern Europe before continuing my schedule on the Iberian peninsula.

And so it went again and again and I was able to spend my twenties seeing much of the world and developing an insatiable desire to continue exploring and becoming exposed to different cultures, peoples, and ways of life. In 2008 I had to get extra pages added into my passport to accommodate the flow of visas and stamps I was accumulating and that’s when I came up with a simple life goal for myself: to have the number of countries I’ve visited always be a higher number than my age.

The last international trip before my injury was in January 2012 when I went to Colombia with one of my closest friends. Because it was the 37th country I had visited at that point, I knew I had a few years buffer before my age would catch up but for a long time, my severely weakened physical state as well as the daunting logistical challenges involved in traveling abroad prevented me from fulfilling my ever-present urge to get out into the world. This was the case until recently when Brita and I decided that enough was enough.

After four and a half years of not leaving the good ol’ U S of A, and countless experiences of hiding my envy and jealousy of my friends and family as they regaled me with their stories of travel, the two of us decided to fly almost as far away as possible and spend two weeks in Indonesia.

After allowing my passport to expire three years ago – a virtually unthinkable prospect back in my heyday of globetrotting – I had to trade in my trusty, wrinkled, beat up version with its haphazard stamps and sewn in extra pages for a blank, lonely new passport. When it arrived, I flipped through its empty pages, wondering if and when I could fill it with more country names (recognizing these as gross oversimplified symbols of novel trips) before readying it to get christened on this first adventure.

Gone were the days of stuffing some items into a backpack and carelessly jumping onto a plane with little planning or preparation, knowing that everything would inevitably work out. Nowadays anywhere I go, even if it’s for one night, requires that I meticulously go through a long list of essential items for my health and comfort. Add on to that the unpredictability of where we were going and how easy or difficult every single thing would be, and my packing list was just a little bit more complicated than it used to be, to say the least.

But pack we did, and I grabbed my lonely, blank, rigid passport and smiled at the thought of this new chapter as we headed out…

Next post: A summary and reflection of our trip 

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11 thoughts on “A slightly less lonely passport

  1. How exciting to be ‘on a plane’ again. I do so hope you and Brita have a safe and wonderful time. But more importantly, I hope this is the start of many more adventures o/seas in the future.
    You may not be able to climb a mountain, but with Brita as a travel companion, you can certainly visit distant shores.

  2. Thank you Arash for your super inspirational writing as ever and for sharing your wonderful self with us – I am really looking forward to hearing your stories from your and Brita’s trip to ‘Indonesia. All my best, Melanie

  3. He’s back now, calm down everyone…!

    Besides I’m somewhat ‘niffed’ Arash didn’t take me with him.

    Next time, if you’ve got a sizeable or even smallish holdall… you perhaps might be able to squeeze me into?

    I’ll be fine, don’t worry about me… for such an eventuality such as this, I’ve been taking ‘contortionist’ lessons from a flying trapezing circus midget.

    One must make sacrifices.

    Oh, & I know it is early, but I am really busy promoting my book http://www.quirkyclaus.com (cheap plug) but if I don’t get around to it Arash, family and fellow commenters… have a good Chrimbo!

    (Had a real issue posting to this Arash, it lost the reply at one point on signin?)

    1. I’ll make a plan to take some friends with me next time 😉 How are those contortionist lessons going? Congrats on your book! That’s fantastic. Sorry about the issues posting. I’ll try to see what’s going on with my terribly limited tech skills. -AB

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